Home Search Sitemap About Us Contact Us
 
Wednesday, September 18, 2019
 
 
P10679 - Advertisement card for Merlo, Merlo and Ray Contracting Co. Note that 'Ray' is an anglicization of the Italian name 'Re'.  Courtesy of Tom Ray.
By 1930 there were over 150 people of Italian origin in business and in the professions: 53 of them in the food category, wholesale and retail stores, with some specialization – fish and oysters, poultry and soft-drink bottling. Three of them were run by women:

P10679 - Advertisement card for Merlo, Merlo and Ray Contracting Co. Note that 'Ray' is an anglicization of the Italian name 'Re'.
Courtesy of Tom Ray
 

Mary Mazzali, Lucy De Marco and Patty Pattinato.

The next largest category with 38 names was that of builders and

contractors, general or specialized, covering every phase of the industry from excavating to roofing, including builders’ supply stores, and tile and block manufacturers.
   
   
Click here to see details & images
 

There were seven restaurants: the first Italian restaurant was opened in 1923-24 by Frank Frustagio or Frustaglio and toward the end of the decade, Chez Mario Café and Hotel. There were in fact three hotels owned by Italians: worthy of special mention is the Hotel Milano, first listed in 1920-21 and owned by Frank Grimaldi. It was situated at 201 Sandwich St. W. exactly where the Cleary Auditorium is today.

Five business centres, also called Italian agencies, each operated respectively by John Borio, L. Meconi, G. Grossi, W. Pricopi and the Ferrari Co. offered a wide variety of services, including banking, notary public, steamship company, interpreter, real estate, foreign exchange, insurance, passports, loans and immigrant placement.

By the end of the 1920s, the Italians could live their entire life span in Windsor without going outside the community in order to satisfy their material, recreational or spiritual needs: the Caboto Club had been founded in 1925, and in 1929, there was the official opening of the Italian Chapel, the first step toward the building in 1939 of St. Angela Merici Church, the hub of Windsor’s “Little Italy” on Erie Street…

 
Back to previous page
 

The opinions and interpretations in this publication are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of the Government of Canada.

 

Copyright © 2005 Windsor Mosaic Website. All rights reserved.