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Friday, July 3, 2020
 
 
American Revolution
War of 1812
Upper Canada Rebellions
American Civil War
 
 
American Revolution
 
Battle re-enactment photo Courtesy of Battlefield House Museum, Stoney Creek, Ontario
  During the American Revolution thousands of former slaves joined the British as both labour and combat forces including the Black Pioneers. Following the Revolution many former slaves migrated to Canada. Some came with white loyalists as part of their households. Others who had taken part in the conflict came as Black loyalists to collect on their promised freedom and
Battle re-enactment photo Courtesy of Battlefield House Museum
Stoney Creek, Ontario
  land.
 
War of 1812
 
The War of 1812, image courtesy of Parks Canada
  In 1812 many black settlers helped to defend their new country. In the Niagara region “The Company of Coloured Men” was formed under Capt. Robert Runchey. Many individuals of African descent joined non-segregated units such as the Glengarry Light Infantry. Many saw action with the 104th Regiment of Foot in the Niagara region.

The War of 1812
Image Courtesy of Parks Canada
   
 
Click here to see List of Black Soldiers - Rebellion of 1838 (List provided by the North American Black Historical Museum)
 
Upper Canada Rebellions
 
Photo courtesy of The Library & Archives of Canada (NAC-ANC C-395)
  The Upper Canada Rebellions (1837 – 1839) once again brought armed conflict to the Windsor region. By 1837 the numbers of African Canadian settlers had grown and they remained steadfastly loyal to the Crown. In December of that year additional black units were raised. Near Chatham, a First and a Second Coloured Company were mustered. In

The Library & Archives of Canada/Charles Beauclerk, N. Hartnell & A. Flint/C-000395
  Windsor, Josiah Henson commanded a company of volunteers linked with the Essex Militia. This unit of volunteers

took part in the capture of the rebel schooner Anne and helped defend Fort Malden. Fifty African Canadian volunteers helped defend Windsor from attack in 1838.

Click here to see List of Black Soldiers - Rebellion of 1838 (List provided by the North American Black Historical Museum)

 
American Civil War
 
29th Regiment from Connecticut at Beaufort, S.C., 1864
  In the 1850’s African Canadians began to receive military honours for their service. The first African-Canadian to receive the Victoria Cross was William Edward Hall of Nova Scotia in recognition for accomplishments in India. During the American Civil War many African Canadians joined the Union Army. Recruiter Martin Robison

29th Regiment from Connecticut at Beaufort, S.C., 1864. Attributed to Sam A. Cooley. Photo Courtesy of the Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division
LC-B82201-341 (4-5)
  Delany of Chatham became the first black commissioned officer in America. Delany received assistance in his efforts from Mary Ann Shadd Cary also of Chatham. Cary was the only woman during the Civil War to be a recruitment officer.
 
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The opinions and interpretations in this publication are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of the Government of Canada.

 

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